The Tempest. RSC at the Barbican theatre.

The Tempest 2017. Simon Russell Beale as Prospero. Photo by Topher McGrillis (c) RSC

The Tempest is one of my favourite Shakespeare plays and I have seen it quite a few times over the years but never like the current RSC production which is gracing the stage of the Barbican theatre. I am going to start by talking about the set and production design- usually a bad sign but not this time. There are moments- whole scenes even- where I could hardly believe what I was seeing. In the hands of the designer Stephen Brimson Lewis and The Imaginarium Studios the island becomes a real character in a way that most productions can only hope for. Its noises, sounds and sweet airs become tangible, set amongst shimmering patterns of light and colour. Bravura spectacles are conjured out of thin air. I was able to watch a Prospero who really did seem to be able to do magic- a fact which made the ending all the more powerful as I had seen with my own eyes what he was giving up. It is the most beautiful thing that I have ever seen on a stage, filling the Barbican theatre with light, colour and illusion. From the moment that the huge ribs of the wooden ship which formed the set began to shake in a fierce sea, an effect created purely by a trick of the light, until Prospero’s perfectly judged, simply spoken, final speech standing in a small pool of white light, over one thousand people were held in the grip of the kind of experience that only live theatre can give you. As the applause started I looked across into the audience, surprised to remember that there were other people alongside me. All that spectacle had been stripped away, distilled down into a single figure on the stage, speaking gently to each one of us individually. If this isn’t the future of large scale theatre I’ll be astonished.

The Tempest. London Barbican 2017. Mark Quartley (centre) as Ariel and Simon Russell Beale as Prospero. Photo by Topher McGrillis (c) RSC

Of course the real wonder of the production lies in Simon Russell Beale’s performance as Prospero. It might have been tempting for an actor playing Prospero, set against that kind of spectacle, to overplay, feeling that they had to be somehow bigger, more commanding just to match up to it. Simon Russell Beale asserts himself quietly by using simple honesty and truth. He means every word that he says. He is the greatest Prospero that I have seen- and I saw Paul Schofield be wonderful in the part when I was a teenager. There is power- as in the electrifying moment when he screams in Ariel’s face, realising that Ariel has greater compassion than he can find in himself at that moment and his own magical power is not enough- but there is great gentleness and humanity too. His scenes with Miranda are tender and raw and his relationship with Ariel is both complex and heartbreaking. This is a play about mortality, a play about accepting your own limitations and those of others, a play about forgiving and letting go. It takes an actor with a big heart and great delicacy to stand at the centre of it and show us that.

The Tempest. London Barbican 2017 Mark Quartley as Ariel. Photo by Topher McGrillis (c) RSC

Ariel is one of the most fascinating characters in Shakespeare and in this production he is placed centre stage both as a character and within the virtual reality. We see him trapped, we see him as a giant screaming harpie, we see him tease, we see him fly. He truly is a watchful, mercurial spirit, belonging everywhere and nowhere, who is both mysterious and strange, but alongside the virtuoso special effects we also need to see and feel a real presence who sulks, does his master’s bidding eagerly or reluctantly, and who longs for his freedom. This can only come from an actor who is physically present. Mark Quartley gives a fine performance which both acknowledges his alter ego and creates a strong, vibrant, yet ethereal presence on stage. It is typical of the attention to detail which is obvious throughout the production that when he is finally released from his bondage he runs out to freedom through the one exit which has not been used at all during the show. We have no idea where he is going.

Jenny Rainsford and Daniel Easton have some nice moments as Miranda and Ferdinand and the comedy is well played- especially when Trinculo hides with Caliban- but it does seem a little thin in comparison to the wonders surrounding it. Jonathan Broadbent is a loathsome and believable usurping brother who deserves all he gets. There is nobody in the cast who lets the side down. It is particularly good to see the masque performed as it is often cut and it is wonderfully sung and staged. The play makes much more sense with it there.

Special effects of any kind can be a mixed blessing. they can overwhelm and take the place of real feeling and humanity. It is a real tribute to the work of the cast, and to the director Greg Doran’s deep understanding of the play that this never happens here. There is a unity of vision which allows the verse to continue to dominate and have clarity.

Just a few times in my life I have seen a production which makes me feel privileged to be there. When the play is The Tempest, one of the first Shakespeare plays that I saw as a young girl, there is a definitive central performance and my favourite character is allowed to run riot among great beauty………. well it just doesn’t get much better than that.

The Tempest. Baxter theatre company/RSC at Leeds Grand Theatre. 2-4-09

Production still by Alastair Muir.

I walked in to find myself in the middle of a matinee audience packed out with high school students. The noise was quite something and the atmosphere was excited and unsettled. Not good. I knew enough about the production to realise that there was hope so I wasn’t too worried and the production proved me right. It was clearly told, well spoken, fast paced and visually stunning and it held their attention, drawing cheers from some of them at the end. Good to think that a few of them will have been turned onto theatre for life as I was when I was taken down from school to see Macbeth (Helen Mirren and Nicol Williamson) and Richard II (Richard Pasco and Ian Richardson) at a similar age. I can put up with a few bottles of water being dropped and the odd urghh at a stage kiss when I think of that.
I loved Antony Sher’s Prospero. This is a favourite play of mine and I have never seen a Prospero where he was so clearly at the end of a long bitter struggle with himself in exile, only sustained by his love for his daughter Miranda. When he finally has his chance for revenge he has to make a difficult journey during the play and realise that he needs to both forgive his enemies and let go of both his bitterness and also allow his daughter to find happiness with Ferdinand away from him. The pain of this is obvious, but when he has done it he can lay down his powers and accept his mortality calmly and peacefully. As he says his every third thought will now be of death.

Production still by Alastair Muir.

It was a wonderful Caliban from John Kani. Most definitely a dignified and dispossessed man rather than a monster, the insults heaped on him became racist insults and his taking possession of his island again is the final image of the production and a very satisfying one too. Like Prospero he can now be at peace.
Ariel was strong and forceful- nothing airy or flighty about him at all and visually and vocally he was stunning. It was a great image when he was set free and Prospero washed off his painted markings with running water. Ariel is one of my favourite characters in all of Shakespeare and he did it justice.
The set was of thick twisted tree roots and branches reaching up to the top of the stage. Every bit of it was used beautifully and lit perfectly to change the mood and focus of a scene. The puppetry was visually stunning, perfectly executed, and set the play in an African context along with the dance and movement. It was exciting and fun to watch. The spirits/puppeteers also added a great deal during the play making the magic of Prospero and Ariel a constant watchful presence.
A perfect piece of storytelling then, clear as a bell, which swept you away and gave you plenty to wonder at and enjoy.