When We Are Married. Northern Broadsides at the Stephen Joseph Theatre, Scarborough. 27-10-16

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The three couples. Production photograph by Nobby Clark.

JB Priestley’s When We Are Married, the story of three deeply respectable Edwardian couples, Yorkshire chapel folk, whose silver wedding celebrations are interrupted by the news that they may not have been properly married at all, is a northern institution for amateur performers- especially those of a certain age. I have seen it before and been in it twice. It has characters who the audience can identify with and solid writing with clearly defined jokes based on character- easy for someone who is well cast to have a go at even if they are not very experienced. Looking back and even remembering line readings from the past as I heard the dialogue again, I was surprised how close the first production that I was in had come to getting it right in a small village hall all those years ago. In short this play is pretty much bombproof- it works. I know it too well. So well that I wasn’t really looking forward to seeing the play itself again after a gap of twenty years or so but since it is an obvious choice for Northern Broadsides, one of my favourite theatre companies, to show off what they do best, I went along. The Thursday matinee that I saw was sold out and the audience loved it. There is clearly still a lot of affection for the play in Yorkshire as well as the company, the couple sitting next to me had already seen the production in York and come back for more. I quickly realised how glad I was that I had not missed it. So many memories of the first time that I was in it, playing Ruby Birtle, the Helliwell’s young maid, came rushing back. I was delighted to see her again. Ruby only has one worthwhile scene with the drunken photographer Henry Ormonroyd, but it is a cracker. This Ruby (Kate Rose-Martin)was very good indeed. I mouthed her lines along with her and waited for every laugh. I even forgave her for missing one very big laugh that I know is there, as she did my memories proud.

The real joy of the play is seeing Annie Parker and Herbert Soppit stand up to their bullying spouses Albert and Clara. Both parts were beautifully played, by Sue Devaney and Steve Hulson, drawing real sympathy and gasps of delight (yes really) from the audience. The laughs may be there but sometimes they also have to be earned by really good timing and theirs was perfect. Kate Anthony and Adrian Hood as Clara and Albert had also done a good job of setting up these moments early on by showing us clearly what Annie and Herbert had to put with. The Helliwells, gracious hosts whose marriage is threatened by an old flame who hears the rumours that Joe is now available, were also nicely played by Geraldine Fitzgerald and Mark Stratton. All three couples worked very well together throughout. The difficulty of living alongside someone else has not changed and this is why the the humour of the play still resonates so powerfully, even in a time where not being married is no longer much of an issue.

When We Are Married will always remain a period piece and the production designer Jessica Worrall has done a fine job. The costumes were wonderful and this really matters in the Stephen Joseph where there is little set and they are seen close up.

As we clapped along to I Do Like To Be Beside The Seaside at the end (very Scarborough and not very Priestley, but he was far more experimental than you would imagine from this play and I don’t think he would have minded) it was so good to be part of a sold out audience who were enjoying a play that has such fond memories for me and to know that it still works like a dream.

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